Self-Efficacy in Research Measure (Phillips & Russell, 1994)

Description:

A 33-item self-report measure of a professional psychology doctoral studentís self-efficacy with respect to doing research. Contains items assessing self-efficacy with respect to research design skills, practical research skills, quantitative and computer skills, and writing skills.

Reference:

Phillips, J. C., & Russell, R. K. (1994). Research self-efficacy, the research training environment, and research productivity among graduate students in counseling psychology. The Counseling Psychologist, 22, 628-641. doi: 10.1177/0011000094224008

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The following items are tasks related to research.  Please indicate your degree of confidence in your ability to successfully accomplish each of the following tasks on a scale of 0 - 9 with 0 representing no confidence and 9 representing total confidence. 

                        1          2          3          4          5          6          7          8          9
            No Confidence                                                                       Total Confidence

1.     Selecting a suitable topic for study
2.     Knowing which statistics to use
3.     Getting an adequate number of subjects
4.     Writing a research presentation for a conference
5.     Writing the method and results section for a research paper for publication
6.     Manipulating data to get it onto a computer system
7.     Writing a discussion section for a thesis or dissertation
8.     Keeping records during a research project
9.     Collecting data
10.   Designing an experiment using non-traditional methods (e.g., ethnographic, cybernetic, phenomenological approaches)
11.   Designing an experiment using traditional methods (e.g., experimental, quasi-experimental designs)
12.   Making time for research
13.   Writing the introduction and literature review for a dissertation
14.   Reviewing the literature in an area of research interest
15.   Writing the introduction and discussion sections for a research paper for publication
16.   Contacting researchers currently working in an area of research interest
17.   Avoiding the violation of statistical assumptions
18.   Writing the method and results sections of a dissertation
19.   Using simple statistics (e.g., t-test, ANOVA, correlation, etc.)
20.   Writing the introduction and literature review for a thesis
21.   Controlling for threats to validity
22.   Formulating hypotheses
23.   Writing the method and results sections of a thesis
24.   Utilizing resources for needed help
25.   Understanding computer printouts
26.   Defending a thesis or dissertation
27.   Using multivariate statistics (e.g., multiple regression, factor analysis, etc.)
28.   Using statistical packages (e.g., SPSS-X, SAS, etc.)
29.   Selecting a sample of subjects from a given population
30.   Selecting reliable and valid instruments
31.   Writing statistical computer programs
32.   Getting money to help pay for research
33.   Operationalizing variables of interest

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Scoring:

Sum items within each subscale for subscale scores, or sum all 33 items for a total score.

Research Design Skills = 1, 10, 11, 21, 22, 29, 30, 33
Practical Research Skills = 3, 8, 9, 12, 16, 24, 26, 32
Quantitative and Computer Skills = 2, 6, 17, 19, 25, 27, 28, 31
Writing Skills = 4, 5, 7, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 23